Author Topic: Passing Routes- The Passing Tree  (Read 20654 times)

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MightyGiants

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Passing Routes- The Passing Tree
« on: January 28, 2008, 10:52:16 AM »
I know when I started to try and learn more about football, this was one of the first things I felt I needed to master.  You will often hear the names of various routes used by announcers, players and writers.   I will tell you that it's complicated concept.  You have what's called a passing tree.  What that is, is that routes are all listed, usually with numbers assigned to them.  Secondly you often will have a different passing tree for WRs, RBs and TEs.    Finally the names of routes are not universal and will vary from coach to coach.   I will start out with a passing tree that covers most of the positions.

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MightyGiants

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Re: Passing Routes- The Passing Tree
« Reply #1 on: January 28, 2008, 10:54:53 AM »
Now I will give you a slightly different take:

Pass Route Tree
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The Pass Route Tree (below) illustrates the basic pass routes run by eligible receivers.  As a rule odd numbered pass routes are run to the inside portion of the field, even numbered routes to the outside.  Basic patterns are to the left in the diagram, specialty routes to the right.  Pass routes can be called by number or by name.  In a passing play like the 838 Deep Cross, the numbers specify that the outside receiver run a #8 patter, the man next inside him a #3 pattern, the next receiver another #8 pattern.  Of course, patterns can be modified.  For example the Float is merely a soft, dragging slant pattern.  The out and up is a combination of a five yard out pattern and the Fly pattern. The pass routes or patterns depicted here are numbered as follows.  #0=The Zero or Curl Pass.  #1=5 yard Cross or In.  #2=5 yard Out or Sideline.  #3=10 yard Cross.  #4=10 yard Out.  #5=10 yard Hook or Stop (In).  #6=10 yard Hook (Outside).  #7=Post. #8=Post Corner.  #9=Fly or Go.  I personally do not favor pass route numbers higher than one digit as this hampers many play calling techniques.  Other pass routes can be specified by letters of the alphabet or by name, as in the Flag, Fade, Slant, Float, and the Out and Up.  Many coaches use what I call the Banana route where a pattern such as the Post is rounded or bowed in shape.


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Other Pass Plays
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    The Out and Up Pass is a dangerous play designed to take advantage of single (Man to Man) coverage.  It requires some "setting up" by having a receiver run the #2 pattern--the five yard out pattern--several times previously.  Then the quarterback simply calls the out and up, the receiver runs the out, the quarterback "pumps" the fake pass, then hits the receiver on the fly.
    The Curl Pass simply calls for a receiver coming out of the back field in the Curl or Zero Pattern.
    The Hitch Pass calls for multiple receivers to one side of the field, then the primary receiver simply steps back a step and catches the quick toss following the blocking of the other receivers around him. One or more linemen can pull around the corner to offer blocking assistance.
    The Hitch and Go calls for a pump fake by the quarterback during the hitch, then hitting the receiver on a fly pattern.  The Hitch and Go is set up by first running a few hitch plays.
    The Hail Mary involves multiple receivers coming together at one deep spot in an effort to outnumber the defenders at the point of reception.
"THE 2007 and 2011 GIANTS WERE NEVER PERFECT, NOR MEANT TO BE.  THEY WERE FIGHTERS, SCRAPPERS, NOW THEY CAN BE CALLED SOMETHING ELSE....WORLD CHAMPIONS!"

MightyGiants

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Re: Passing Routes- The Passing Tree
« Reply #2 on: January 28, 2008, 10:56:31 AM »
Finally here is a simple passing tree for a WR on the left side and a RB passing tree.
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MightyGiants

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Re: Passing Routes- The Passing Tree
« Reply #3 on: July 06, 2008, 10:03:27 AM »
Here is a good article that explains and expands on this topic.  Just skip the first paragraph on their spelling be and go right to the passing tree article.  When you read it, you will see WRs do have a lot to learn, when they get to the NFL.

http://www.footballoutsiders.com/2008/06/05/ramblings/too-deep-zone/6320/
"THE 2007 and 2011 GIANTS WERE NEVER PERFECT, NOR MEANT TO BE.  THEY WERE FIGHTERS, SCRAPPERS, NOW THEY CAN BE CALLED SOMETHING ELSE....WORLD CHAMPIONS!"

Vette

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Re: Passing Routes- The Passing Tree
« Reply #4 on: January 31, 2016, 06:51:56 PM »
Here is one of the top topics from the Chalk Talk Board.
"There is a greater purpose...that purpose is team. Winning, losing, playing hard, playing well, doing it for each other, winning the right way, winning the right way is a very important thing to me... Championships are won by teams who love one another, who respect one another, and play for and support one another."
~ Coach Tom Coughlin

Mr. Matt

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Re: Passing Routes- The Passing Tree
« Reply #5 on: February 01, 2016, 12:04:13 PM »
I love looking at these trees and thinking back to certain receivers who I identify with certain routes, or certain variations on them.

Amani Toomer, for example, I will always associate with the out-and-up or the post corner. When Kerry Collins got time to let those double moves develop, his smooth cuts would leave DBs in the dust.

Victor Cruz and Ike Hilliard ran those zone-option routes to perfection. Remember the San Fran DB crying on the sideline about how he couldn't cover Cruz 1-on-1 in the NFC Championship because he couldn't read when he was going? Hilliard would sit down in those underneath zones like no other. He rarely had the speed to get deep behind a cheating safety -- but for one memorable time in that '01 NFC Championship when he and Collins made the right read and he streaked in for the easy TD on the first play.

Plax and Eli perfected the fade route, they seemed to have telepathy about knowing whether to go over the top for the jump ball or that sneaky back-shoulder throw. Ask Al Harris about that!

Mark Bavaro used to run this variation on the out route where he would quickly cut out, then back inside, spinning the defender off him. Tony Gonzalez also used to run a similar route years later.

Finally, Dave Meggett running the option routes out of the backfield. In '89-'90, the Giants would go "All-9" on about 30% of their 3rd downs, let Meggett slip out into an open area, and work his magic.


JimboWHO

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Re: Passing Routes- The Passing Tree
« Reply #6 on: February 01, 2016, 03:04:29 PM »
I love looking at these trees and thinking back to certain receivers who I identify with certain routes, or certain variations on them.

Amani Toomer, for example, I will always associate with the out-and-up or the post corner. When Kerry Collins got time to let those double moves develop, his smooth cuts would leave DBs in the dust.

Victor Cruz and Ike Hilliard ran those zone-option routes to perfection. Remember the San Fran DB crying on the sideline about how he couldn't cover Cruz 1-on-1 in the NFC Championship because he couldn't read when he was going? Hilliard would sit down in those underneath zones like no other. He rarely had the speed to get deep behind a cheating safety -- but for one memorable time in that '01 NFC Championship when he and Collins made the right read and he streaked in for the easy TD on the first play.

Plax and Eli perfected the fade route, they seemed to have telepathy about knowing whether to go over the top for the jump ball or that sneaky back-shoulder throw. Ask Al Harris about that!

Mark Bavaro used to run this variation on the out route where he would quickly cut out, then back inside, spinning the defender off him. Tony Gonzalez also used to run a similar route years later.

Finally, Dave Meggett running the option routes out of the backfield. In '89-'90, the Giants would go "All-9" on about 30% of their 3rd downs, let Meggett slip out into an open area, and work his magic.

They called it "Scat" - can still see Simms on the sidelines telling Parcells he wants to "go Scat" and Parcells bellowing "Don't make your mind up on him (Meggett), I'm trying to get the first down here."


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