Author Topic: Remembering  (Read 162 times)

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LennG

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Remembering
« on: January 01, 2017, 08:24:43 PM »
I'll leave this topic at that, if others want to share stories from their lives or from those that they came in contact with.

As I said in the other thread, about this one lady, Mrs Halpern,  who went thru the Holocaust and related many stories about her experiences, but thru all her suffering, she always had some positive spin on things.

Just some things she told me. She was a baker in the camp. ( I do not remember which camp she was in). She stayed alive and kept others alive by smuggling small pieces of rotting and moldy bread. The inmates, if they knew some one was sick, used to sort of pool their scraps together so the sick could have maybe an extra portion.

But her amazing stories were after liberation. There were two people, man and woman, who survived the camp and wanted to be married after they were liberated. They got Mrs. Halpern to bake them a wedding cake. She was so overwhelmed by this 'honor' she made the biggest wedding cake she could. It was the first happy thing to have happened to all of them in many years.

She told me stories of how so many people just did not know about their families. Hundreds and thousands used to wait at the railroad stations, days, weeks, months, just hoping to see some one they knew. Most never found anyone.

A true story, that was published in one of the 'Chicken Soup for the Soul' books.

A boy survived the Holocaust with one possession, a small Chanukkah menorah which he had hidden for the time he was in the camp. On liberation, he had no one, so one soldier took pity on him, and thru channels, was able to adopt him and bring him to the United States. Every year, for years, on Chanukkah, they lit the menorah and put it in their window. One day, a woman was passing and saw the menorah in the window. She knocked on the door and asked about it. It was the boys mother, who had survived the camp and now reunited with her son. TRUE STORY

As I said, these are the type of stories this wonderful lady related to me, trying to be upbeat on so many things, and to drown out the horror.
I HATE TO INCLUDE THE WORD NASTY< BUT THAT IS PART OF BEING A WINNING FOOTBALL TEAM.

Charlie Weiss

gregf

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Re: Remembering
« Reply #1 on: January 01, 2017, 08:42:46 PM »
Good stuff Lenn. I enjoyed watching the You tube clips Tucker recommended as well about Holocaust survivors.

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jimv

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Re: Remembering
« Reply #2 on: January 01, 2017, 10:54:42 PM »
GREAT, Lenny!  Stories like this about the Holocaust remind us that, despite what happens to us in our lives, there is always someone worse off.

"I cried because I had no shoes until I met a man who had no feet!"

tucker115

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Re: Remembering
« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2017, 02:08:26 AM »
Thanks Lenn. That first shoot I did for Shoah,  the husband told this story about the end of the war.

 He was a big teenager, so he was used as slave labor by the Nazis. He and the other victims/prisoners (there were Russian soldiers forced to work, as well) had to tunnel into mountains because the allied bombers were coming over Germany every day. The work was always brutal, but this was especially so because the German soldiers were afraid. If you were an especially good worker and you got hurt, in the past, they would make a small effort to try to fix the injury. Now, you were shot immediately.

 One day the SS showed up and all the Jewish workers were brought to the docks and locked into cargo holds. The SS told them they were being shipped to Poland. When they were all locked in, they heard the SS tell the crew to head to deep water and sink the ship. Before the ship could leave port, the British arrived. The British offered the Jews as much food as they could eat and it ended up killing many of them. Their bodies couldn't take it. A British doctor arrived, screamed at the soldiers to stop feeding the Jews because they had to brought along slowly with small amounts of food to allow their bodies to recover. Many had to eat baby food.

After a few weeks, the husband said he was fully recovered. He said the British gave them free reign to do whatever they wanted during the day. He said he beat up several German citizens. If a British soldier saw you beating some one, you just pulled up your sleeve, show him your number, and the soldier would look the other way. He laughed and said sometimes he thought the Brits hated the Germans more than he did, but they were too well trained to beat the hell out of the Germans. He laughed again and said, " I had no such training". All the Jews were to be back at the docks before nightfall. The British wanted the doctors to keep an eye on them and the soldiers wanted to make sure they were safe.

 The husband said the docks were boring, so he went exploring. There had been a Nazi naval regiment stationed there, so he went into their base. He found a German Captain's uniform and put it on. He decided he liked it and was going to wear it. A squad of British soldiers almost lost their minds when he came walking out of the base. They thought he was a Nazi officer. One of them recognized him and started yelling at him that he couldn't wear that and they had almost shot him. The husband said he was very upset that he was not allowed to wear the uniform because he "looked so damn good".